Design

3Novices:Qiang Huang makes furniture to incorporate salvaged parts from shared bicycles

Qiang Huang's Bike Scavengers furniture is made from salvaged shared bicycles

Central Saint Martins graduate Qiang Huang has created a range of unfinished furniture bases that need to be completed by adding components from discarded shared bikes.

Named Bike Scavengers, Huang‘s furniture is designed to be used by an association that would encourage participants to disassemble bikes left on the street and transform the salvaged parts into usable products.

The association would provide unfinished elements that would require different bike components to create items of furniture including a bench, a stool, a trolley and a lamp.

Qiang Huang's Bike Scavengers furniture is made from salvaged shared bicycles

She developed the system to tackle the huge amount of waste that is likely to result from these discarded bikes by proposing a system for salvaging and reusing components to create statement furniture.

Huang’s project is a response to the explosion of cycle-sharing schemes in urban centres around the world. In China alone around 20 million shared bikes are currently operated by more than 60 companies.

Qiang Huang's Bike Scavengers furniture is made from salvaged shared bicycles

“At the heart of the project is a critique of the environmental detriment caused by bike-sharing schemes in their operations and unregulated growth in China,” said Huang.

“Presenting what a bike-made product looks like gives an opportunity to our users to be upcycling practitioners and to take social responsibility.”

Qiang Huang's Bike Scavengers furniture is made from salvaged shared bicycles

The collection includes a Bench of Saddles featuring a metal frame with rows of vertical fixings for attaching 36 discarded saddles. The interlocking saddles form a single seating surface with a repetitive pattern that the designer said “refers to the over-production of shared bikes”.

Other items include lamps made from salvaged mudguards, a stool featuring six saddles attached to a stem-like base, and a kitchen trolley created by fixing bike baskets to a simple frame with wheels.

Qiang Huang's Bike Scavengers furniture is made from salvaged shared bicycles

“These products could not only be functional commodities but also provocative pieces reminding people how bike sharing affected us and in what way we could protect our living environment and future,” the designer suggested.

Huang added that an important part of the project would involve overcoming the negative connotations of the word “scavenger” and instead celebrating the work of people who perform the role of repurposing these overproduced and disused bikes.

Qiang Huang's Bike Scavengers furniture is made from salvaged shared bicycles

Chinese bike-sharing company Mobike recently announced plans to withdraw its fleet of dockless bikes from Manchester, England, following unsustainable levels of theft and vandalism.

The same company has also developed an electric version of its signature orange bicycle, and French company Zoov has also developed a system of electric sharing bikes that lock together.

The post Qiang Huang makes furniture to incorporate salvaged parts from shared bicycles appeared first on Dezeen.

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Design

3Novices:Take a tour of Latin America via our Pinterest boards

This week on our Pinterest account we’re showcasing the architecture of Latin America, including projects in Chile, Brazil and Mexico.

Open the Pinterest app on your phone, tap the camera icon and scan the Pincode below to explore Dezeen’s feed.

The post Take a tour of Latin America via our Pinterest boards appeared first on Dezeen.

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Design

3Novices:Yakusha Design applies dark tones throughout its Kiev offices

Ya Vsesvit by Yakusha Design

Mottled grey walls meet black-brick partitions to form the monochromatic interiors of Yakusha Design’s self-designed office and showroom in Kiev, Ukraine.

Ya Vsesvit by Yakusha Design

Named Ya Vsesvit, the office accommodates Yakusha Design‘s own studio, a showroom and an 80-seat lecture room for events.

The studio is lead by Ukranian architect and designer Victoriya Yakusha, who wanted to create a space where different “design-minded” individuals within the company could work under one roof, encouraging the potential for collaboration.

Ya Vsesvit by Yakusha Design

“The space is created for architects, fashion designers, visualizers, stylists, photographers and copywriters – anyone who hunts for inspiration,” explained Yakusha.

“[Ya Vsesvit] also means ‘I’m the universe’ in Ukrainian, so the interior is built on the idea of combining.”

Ya Vsesvit by Yakusha Design

Yakusha herself comes from a multi-disciplinary background. As well as running her own design studio, she heads up Faina – a furniture brand that makes pieces out of traditional materials from her native country like clay, wood, willow and flax.

The brand will also be based out of Ya Vsesvit.

Ya Vsesvit by Yakusha Design

When it came to developing the interiors, Yakusha Design opted for a largely monochromatic colour scheme.

Several partitions made from jet-black bricks appear throughout the space, contrasting against the surrounding structural walls which have been roughly rendered with grey clay.

Black-framed panels of glazing close off the main meeting room and a couple of small offices. One of them is centred by a chunky desk crafted from a single block of sandstone.

Ya Vsesvit by Yakusha Design

Decorative ornaments and furnishings in Ya Vsesvit are largely designed by Faina, allowing the space to double-up as a showroom for Yakusha.

Items include the brand’s tapering Trembita vase, which takes its name from a traditional Ukranian wind instrument, and its organically-shaped Ztista chairs which are punctuated with holes.

Faina’s huge woven Strikha lamp has also been suspended over a work table, which takes cues from the straw roofs of Ukranian huts.

Ya Vsesvit by Yakusha Design

Shiny foil-effect seating poufs and large wall mirrors have also been dotted around. Metal shelving has then been integrated into the walls to keep work areas clutter-free.

“The biggest aim in this project was to stay honest, to create a design that’s able to live in the future and not only one or two years, as all trends do,” added the studio.

Ya Vsesvit by Yakusha Design

Ya Vsesvit is longlisted in this year’s Dezeen Awards in the Small Workspace Interior category. It will compete head-to-head against projects like The Wing Dumbo, which is decked out with colourful furnishings, and Space10’s head office, which has a flexible floor plan divided by mobile partitions.

Photography is by Mikey Estrada.

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