Design

3Novices:Two brothers share La Fraternelle retreat by Atelier Pierre Thibault

The brothers that commissioned Quebec City-based Atelier Pierre Thibault to create them a shared weekend house each have a separate black block to accommodate their family.

La Fraternelle by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Completed last year, La Fraternelle – or The Brotherly – is located in Charlevoix, a popular ski destination outside Quebec City. The clients tasked Atelier Pierre Thibault with completing a home for their two families, while still providing a degree of independence and privacy.

La Fraternelle by Atelier Pierre Thibault

“Two black volumes with slightly different orientations are laid out above a plinth that nestles into the site’s steep slope,” Atelier Pierre Thibault explained.

Each of the angular black volumes contains an open-concept kitchen, living and dining room on the ground level.

La Fraternelle by Atelier Pierre Thibault

A flight of wooden steps leads to the master bedroom, which only occupies part of the plan. “The idea of a box within a box influenced the design of the bedroom, which is suspended and seems to be floating amongst the trees,” said the studio.

Opposite the bedroom is a small office loft, which overlooks the living spaces below.

One side of each volume is taken up by an expansive double-height screened porch, which allows the residents to maximise their time outdoors. The remainder of the plinth serves as a terrace that both families can use communally.

La Fraternelle by Atelier Pierre Thibault

The lower level of the two homes features the same layout, mirrored along the centre. Here, the architects included two additional bedrooms, as well as a lounge area, and sauna for each of the homes. A doorway allows members of each family to pass through to the other’s living space.

La Fraternelle by Atelier Pierre Thibault

For this project, Atelier Pierre Thibault opted for a minimalist palette, using built-in or custom furniture wherever possible, as a way to emphasise the landscape over the interiors. “The large glazed openings and restrained interior furnishings facilitate contemplation,” said the studio.

La Fraternelle by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Siblings that have clubbed together so they can both enjoy secondary residences in Quebec include two sisters that commissioned a wing-roofed home by YH2, and a pair that built a house comprising stacked and rotated boxes by Atelier Boom-Town.

Photography is by Maxime Brouillet.

Project credits:

Project leaders: Pierre Thibault and Mathieu Leclerc
Project staff: Étienne Lemay and Nicolas Labrie
Built-in and custom furniture: Francis Gaignard

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3Novices:Red concrete meditation space sits under pyramidal roof in rural India

This simple concrete temple in a village near the Indian city of Pune is topped with a pyramidal roof and incorporates a channel that allows ceremonial holy water to flow out into its lush surroundings.

Designed by locally based Karan Darda Architects, the temple is located within an orchard of chikoo trees in a traditional farming region in the western Indian state of Maharashtra.

Shiva Temple by Karan Darda Architects

The temple is dedicated to the Hindu deity Shiva and was built for the area’s farmers to use for daily worship.

The building provides all the essential spaces required for worship but reinterprets the historical precedents of Hindu temple architecture by combining it with the region’s vernacular architecture.

Shiva Temple by Karan Darda Architects

“The design intends to look like a sculpture and is a result of careful extraction from the traditional forms, put together in a simpler way so that the locals could easily associate themselves with it,” Karan Darda founder of Karan Darda Architects explained.

A simple red-brick wall lines the dirt track leading towards the temple, which is tucked in among the trees to partly conceal it from visitors and passers by.

Shiva Temple by Karan Darda Architects

The building is constructed from concrete with a reddish-orange hue that matches the colour of the brick and surrounding earth. Its square base twists upwards into a triangle at its apex, creating a roof with a dynamic five-sided pyramidal form.

Typical Hindu temples feature an inner sanctum reached through one or several porch-like structures called mandapas. However, this simplified version has a small sanctum that opens directly onto the surrounding concrete plinth.

Shiva Temple by Karan Darda Architects

An angled opening in one of the walls forms the entrance to the sanctum, while a small adjoining meditation space allows users to stop in for a quick prayer before going back to work.

“As you arrive at the temple the structure seems like a normal square-based pyramid in a meditating state, metaphorically speaking,” Darda suggested, “but as you move around, you discover the protruding mass makes the building feel like it’s dancing.”

Shiva Temple by Karan Darda Architects

Apart from the entrance, the only other opening in the temple’s solid exterior is a slit in one wall that allows a breeze and a shaft of daylight to enter the internal space.

One of the walls is pulled out to create space for the meditation area. This simple intervention breaks up the overall mass and produces a cantilever where it meets the entrance opening.

Shiva Temple by Karan Darda Architects

The open slit intersects with a channel that continues through the concrete base. Holy water poured over a likeness of Shiva during the worship ceremony is directed into the channel and flows out from the temple onto the ground outside.

At the Venice Architecture Biennale 2018, the Vatican City presented a series of woodland structures aimed at investigating the meaning of the chapel.

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3Novices:Josh Carmody’s clamp system turns material samples into tables

Melbourne-based designer Josh Carmody has designed a system of clamps that can connect architects and designers’ unwanted material samples to create tables .

Called the Remnants table series, Carmody‘s design system comprises timber table legs fitted with circular brass clamps for fixing a table top.

The clamps can hold materials up to 30 milimetres thick allowing users to select their own tabletop surface from materials that they already have.

Josh Carmody makes tables using materials from a samples library

The versatile leg clamps can securely join together several different materials into numerous desired configuration. Numerous clamps can be combined with materials to form large tables, or a single leg and clamp can be used to form a side table.

Carmody told Dezeen that he created the table with architects and interior designers in mind, and in particular, the stone, tile and timber samples that are typically gathering dust in their studio libraries.

Josh Carmody makes tables using materials from a samples library

“The Remnants table series identifies the design studio libraries as an overlooked material source for furniture,” explained Carmody.

“Every design studio has a material samples library, which often store hundreds of beautifully finished stone samples that regularly get thrown away.”

Josh Carmody makes tables using materials from a samples library

“In response to this waste cycle, I designed this versatile hardware system, in the hopes of facilitating a process of reusing these waste materials in creation of luxurious yet sustainable furniture pieces,” he continued.

The design, which is made in Melbourne, was first debuted in Milan in 2017.

Josh Carmody makes tables using materials from a samples library

Most recently, it won the Object category at the INDE. Awards – a ceremony that recognises the most progressive buildings, spaces, objects, proposals and people from across the Asia Pacific region.

In 2015, Spanish designers Maria Roca and Erika Biarnes debuted a removable leg module that allows customers to turn almost any flat surface into a tabletop, while in 2009 Kingston University graduate Ryan Sorrell designed a set of table legs that can be clamped onto the corners of varying thicknesses of board to form a table.

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3Novices:This week, the RIBA Stirling Prize shortlist was announced and IKEA recalled a pet product

This week, RIBA announced six finalists competing for the annual Stirling Prize, and Swedish retail giant IKEA recalled a water dispenser following the death of two dogs.

The Stirling Prize recognises the British building that is judged to have made the greatest contribution to architecture this year.

Foster + Partners had a building shortlisted for the eighth time, while Niall McLaughlin Architects Waugh Thistleton Architects, Henley Halebrown and Jamie Fobert Architects with Evans & Shalev, were all shortlisted for the first time.

IKEA recalls Lurvig water dispenser for pets
IKEA recalls Lurvig water dispenser for pets following dog deaths

Customers who purchased IKEA’s Lurvig water dispenser for pets have been urged to return the water-dispensing dome following the death of two dogs who suffocated when their heads became trapped.

David Chipperfield Architects completes visitor centre and chapel at Inagawa Cemetery
David Chipperfield Architects completes pink visitor centre and chapel at Inagawa Cemetery

Photographer Edmund Sumner captured David Chipperfield Architects’ recently completed pink pigmented concrete visitor centre and chapel at Inagawa Cemetery in Japan.

In Iceland Basalt Architects revealed The Retreat hotel at Blue Lagoon, which is designed to embrace the areas impressive scenery while minimising its impact on the UNESCO Global Geopark.

Researchers from Universidade da Coruña in Spain have designed an algorithm to predict what its future skyline will look like
Algorithm developed to predict the vertical growth of cities

In other architecture news, researchers from Universidade da Coruña in Spain designed an algorithm that uses historical and economic data from an urban area to predict what its future skyline will look like.

Plans have also been revealed by Scandinavian architecture firm White Arkitekter to build a psychiatric clinic in Nuuk, Greenland. It will be finished in pale yellow to strike “the perfect balance between a calm, healing, and trustworthy atmosphere”.

Goodwood Festival of Speed sculpture by Gerry Judah celebrates 70 years of Porsche production

This week, the 25th annual Goodwood Festival of Speed sculpture by Gerry Judah was unveiled in West Sussex, England. It features six Porsches as a celebration of 70 years of production at the car brand.

At the festival Aston Martin launched its Volante Vision Concept aircraft, a flying autonomous, hybrid-electric vehicle, which is the car brand’s first aircraft.

Lapella chair by Zaha Hadid Architects
Zaha Hadid Architects reinterprets classic Hans J Wegner chair in stone

In design news, Danish designer Hans J Wegner’s 1963 CH07 lounge chair has been recreated by Zaha Hadid Architects, using stone and carbon fibre.

Kingston School of Art graduate Oksana Bondar also designed a chair, that’s crafted from a combination of human hair and a biodegradable plastic so that the whole chair can decompose.

Digital rendering artist Alexis Christodoulou creates dream-like architectural spaces
Alexis Christodoulou creates dream-like architectural spaces for Instagram

Popular projects on Dezeen this week included Alex Christodoulou’s dream-like architectural spaces for Instagram, a Chelsea Pied-à- Terre featuring a green and gold mural, and a compact “starter home” for skinny spaces in New Orleans.

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3Novices:Escolano + Steegmann creates apartment that recalls rooftops of Barcelona

Bold geometric shapes and terracotta tiles are used to reference the city rooftops in Escolano + Steegmann’s renovation of an apartment in Barcelona.

Called Casa Conxita, the 84-square-metre apartment has a linear, east-west layout that looks out onto the street at one end and into a courtyard at the other.

Escolano + Steegmann create apartment that recalls rooftops of Barcelona

The plan is divided lengthways into two zones with the private spaces, such as bedrooms and bathrooms arranged along one side, and one large open-plan social space occupying the other.

The architects said the use of this open-plan social space is open for interpretation, but it’s primary function is to allow light to travel from one end of the apartment to the other.

“The program is not fixed, but mostly suggested,” said Escolano + Steegmann. “The topography gives rise to the different scenes of domesticity.”

Escolano + Steegmann create apartment that recalls rooftops of Barcelona

A series of small steps at the courtyard end of both the private and social spaces bridge the 40-centimetre height difference between the apartment and the courtyard patio.

The kitchen and dining room sit in the centre of the apartment, on the cusp of each zone.

The divide between the two areas is marked by a series of sliding timber walls that run along a metal track.

Escolano + Steegmann create apartment that recalls rooftops of Barcelona

“The sliding surface filter works as a dynamic device that introduces complexity into the plan, allowing the construction of various forms of spatial arrangement, subject to different degrees of privacy or mutual exclusion” explained the architects.

The architects deliberately used specific materials to define the apartment’s movable and static elements.

“The materiality of the project is simple,” they said. “Wood is used for the tectonic – as a definition of the mobile elements, and ceramic tiles, habitual in most of the roofs of the city, are used as a definition of the static.”

The geometric shapes and elements used in the apartment are also designed to reference the shape and colour of the city’s buildings and rooftops.

Escolano + Steegmann create apartment that recalls rooftops of Barcelona

The apartment features an original vaulted brick ceiling – known locally as a Catalan arch. These arches have been featured in a number of apartment and retail renovation projects in the area including the nearby showroom of Spanish furniture brand Kettal, which was designed by Patricia Urquiola.

Photography is by José Hevia.


Project credits:

Architect: Escolano + Steegmann
Lead Architects: Adrià Escolano and David Steegmann.
Structures: José Ovejero
General contractors: Barnamodul
Construction manager: Robert Bagó

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3Novices:Carlo Ratti and Sidewalk Labs collaborate to build reconfigurable Dynamic Street

Italian architect Carlo Ratti and Alphabet company Sidewalk Labs have worked together on a modular paving system that can change the use of a street throughout the day.

Dynamic Street is a prototype paver developed by Carlo Ratti Associati (CRA) alongside Sidewalk Labs — the urbanism-focused subsidiary of Google parent company Alphabet.

The Dynamic Street by Sidewalk Labs and Carlo Ratti

The system of hexagonal pavers is designed to be easily picked up and moved around “within hours or even minutes”, according to CRA.

The goal is to enable the same stretch of road or pavement to be used for different purposes at different times of the day or week. CRA gives the example of an urban passageway that is busy with foot and bicycle traffic during rush hour, but quiet for the rest of the day.

The Dynamic Street by Sidewalk Labs and Carlo Ratti

Dynamic Street would enable this strip to be transformed into a play space in the middle of the day, or reconfigured for a block party or basketball game on weekends.

“The Dynamic Street creates a space for urban experimentation,” said Ratti, who also serves as the director of the Senseable City Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “With this project, we aim to create a streetscape that responds to citizens’ ever-changing needs.”

The Dynamic Street by Sidewalk Labs and Carlo Ratti

In addition to being easy to rearrange, the Dynamic Street pavers are embedded with lights that can be set to communicate crossings, bike lanes, pick-up zones or other guidance.

Each paver also has a slot for inserting optional vertical elements, such as bollards, bike racks, exercise equipment, microphone stands or basketball hoops.

The Dynamic Street by Sidewalk Labs and Carlo Ratti

CRA project manager Emma Greer believes that it will become even more useful to have flexible streetscapes with the arrival of self-driving cars.

“Self-driving cars will change both the number of lanes and the amount of parking we will need,” she said. “The Dynamic Street explores a flexible platform that allows people to see how technology can evolve and respond to different conditions.”

The Dynamic Street by Sidewalk Labs and Carlo Ratti

The Dynamic Street is inspired by a developments in removable pavers made by French research group IFSTTAR in the city of Nantes.

CRA and Sidewalk Labs’ prototype is made from wood, but the creators envision the finished product coming in a range of materials, including concrete and rubber.

The Dynamic Street by Sidewalk Labs and Carlo Ratti

The project is on display at Sidewalk Labs’ 307 workspace in Toronto, where 232 of the modular pavers are arranged to simulate an 11-metre-wide street. It’s open to visitors every weekend throughout the summer.

Sidewalk Labs is in the process of redeveloping an unused stretch of waterfront in the city — Canada’s largest — which will incorporate several experimental elements and innovative tech.

The Dynamic Street by Sidewalk Labs and Carlo Ratti

In an interview with Dezeen, the company’s head of urban systems Rohit Aggarwala said that their goal is to “speed up” the process of urban regeneration by taking advantage of newly available technologies.

Ratti similarly incorporates cutting-edge tech into his projects. Recent examples include Turin’s high-tech Office 3.0, a smart road system and a sewage-sampling robot for eliminating diseases.

Photography is by David Pike.

Project credits:

CRA Team: Carlo Ratti, Giovanni de Niederhausern, Saverio Panata, Emma Greer (project leader), James Schrader, Rui Guan, Luca Giacolini, Alessandro Tassinari, Aunie Frisch
Construction: Pac Team

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3Novices:BIG U flood defences for Manhattan move forward

The first phase of Bjarke Ingels’ barrier system designed to protect Lower Manhattan from tidal surges and rising sea levels is getting underway.

A request for proposal (RFP) for has been issued to find a stewardship partner for the BIG U project, which was created by a team that includes the Danish architect’s firm BIG and Dutch studio One Architecture & Urbanism.

BIG U flood defences for Manhattan

The scheme was one of several winners in a competition initiated by Rebuild by Design in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, which damaged large swaths of the US eastern seaboard in 2012.

The BIG U defences are designed to prevent the extensive flooding experienced by Lower Manhattan during the storm, and combat sea-level rise expected as a result of climate change.

BIG U flood defences for Manhattan

Plans involve creating a 10-mile barrier that would stretch from West 57th Street, wrap around the southern tip of Manhattan, and run back up the other side to East 42nd Street.

Phase one, known as the East Side Coastal Resiliency (ESCR) project, will focus on a section of the East River Park along the Lower East Side – using $335 million (£256 million) in combined public and private funds.

BIG U flood defences for Manhattan

A “bridging berm” barrier – planted with a selection of salt-tolerant flora, and including public spaces and viewpoints – is proposed to protect the low-lying ground. Ingels explains more about the project in a movie filmed by Dezeen in 2014.

The RPF issued by Rebuild By Design and Good Old Lower East Side (GOLES) calls for a partner “to explore and ultimately recommend potential park stewardship models with funding mechanisms that could enhance the long-term operating budget while addressing issues of equity”.

BIG U flood defences for Manhattan

The submission deadline is 9 August 2018, and the chosen organisation will be informed by the end of the same month. The research project will then take place over the following eight weeks.

Other members of the BIG U competition team include Starr Whitehouse, James Lima Planning + Development, Green Shield Ecology, AEA Consulting, Level Agency for Infrastructure, ARCADIS, and Buro Happold.

BIG U flood defences for Manhattan

BIG and One Architecture & Urbanism have also collaborated for a more recent Resilient by Design competition, which aims to tackle the effects of climate change on the Bay Area.

The studios have proposed a scheme to prevent a creek in San Francisco from flooding.

BIG has several other projects on the go in New York City, where it has an office. The firm’s twisting towers beside the High Line park are well underway, and initial construction has begun on The Spiral skyscraper that forms part of the huge Hudson Yards development on Manhattan’s West Side.

However, its Two World Trade Center still hasn’t made it above ground level as tenants for the offices are yet to be secured.

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