Design

3Novices:Cuboid extension by EL Studio sits atop a Maryland bungalow

New York firm EL Studio has placed a contemporary box-shaped extension on top of this suburban home in Maryland to more than double its size.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

The Lincoln Street Residence was recently completed by EL Studio founders Elizabeth Emerson and Mark Lawrence for a young family with two small children. The clients wanted to expand their living space while preserving their existing home in the small town of Bethesda.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

“[The clients] wanted more space for play and individual bedrooms, but expressed a desire not to ‘lose one another’ in a home too vast or impersonal,” said the architects.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

To create more living space, the architects removed an existing portion of the home and replaced it with a two-storey structure. The upper storey takes the shape of a cuboid, and extends over the flat portion of the bungalow to meet a side of its main gabled roof.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

This extension houses a play room for the kids on the ground floor and a bedroom of each of them above, as well as a master suite that overlooks the back yard. It adds 2,980 square feet (277 square metres) to the 2,265-square-foot (210-square-metre) home.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

The upper storey is accessed by a long flight of stairs sheltered by a slatted wooden screen. The volume cantilevers above a porch, providing protection to the outdoor spaces below.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

A tall, slender window illuminates the double-height play space at the centre, which the architects described as the focal point of the home’s new configuration. “The playroom’s double-height volume binds all of the programmes, and provides access to the garden through a covered porch tucked under the master suite,” they said.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

The front of the house retains its original appearance, which the architects describe as “a relic of the first wave of suburban development in this area”.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

The exterior was painted a bright shade of blue on areas of the earlier building, and left blank across the new addition. This colour choice complements the materiality of the roof, which is made of reflective metal panels.

Lincoln Street Residence by EL Studio

Summarising the project, the architects said that the renovation “resists the current inner-ring suburban trend towards demolition of older, smaller homes in favour of new over-scaled ‘farmhouses'”.

Other projects that emphasise children’s needs in their design include a home in Canada where the entire upper story is reserved just for kids and a community centre that forms a “mini city” for youngsters in a repurposed warehouse in Sydney.

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3Novices:Scullion Architects adds charred-larch tower to terraced home in Dublin

Located near Dublin’s docklands, this three-storey Georgian terraced house has been converted from three bed-sits into one light-filled “upside-down house” with a charred-larch extension at the back.

Grand Canal Street house by Scullion architects

Designed by Scullion Architects, the refurbishment flips the traditional house layout on its head, positioning the open-plan kitchen and living room on the top floor, bedrooms on the floors below, and the bathrooms in the new charred-larch extension.

“Our clients were a young couple who wanted to turn this city centre property into a home for entertaining and enjoying the views of its Dublin docklands setting,” explained Scullion Architects.

Grand Canal Street house by Scullion architects

The property, which formerly housed separate studio bed-sits on each of its three floors, was in a run down state when works began.

“Most of the original decorative plasterwork and joinery features of the home had been lost, with the exception of the main hallway and staircase, which were reasonably intact,” the studio recalled.

Grand Canal Street house by Scullion architects

“The roof was in poor condition, and in need of total replacement. As each floor has been converted into bedsits, poorly constructed bathrooms interrupted the floor plan on every level,” it added.

The firm managed to retain the perimeter walls of the house, as well as the stairs, entrance hall and floors. An entirely new roof structure with vast rooflights at its apex was inserted, providing clear views of the sky from the repositioned living room and kitchen.

Grand Canal Street house by Scullion architects

A tower-like extension that houses the new bathrooms, was added to the rear of the house. Spanning three floors, the extension also incorporates a terrace that leads from the ground floor down to the garden on the lower ground level.

The architects chose to clad the tower in Shou Sugi Ban, or charred larch, for its “shadow-like presence” and the contrast its dark carbon crust created next to the untreated natural copper parapet.

Grand Canal Street house by Scullion architects

The bathrooms and upper-ground floor terrace have shielded views through charred-timber screens that obstruct direct over-looking from the neighbouring rear gardens.

While the open-plan kitchen and living room were repositioned on the top floor where the occupants could best enjoy the light and views, bedrooms were placed on the upper ground floor, with a garden-level living area and bedroom below.

Grand Canal Street house by Scullion architects

To maximize on space, sliding doors give access to storage concealed within the thickness of walls, and opaque glazed steel framed sliding doors give access to the new bathrooms from the staircase.

Grand Canal Street house by Scullion architects

In addition, all stairwell doors feature Crittal-style glazing to allow light to funnel down into the middle of the house and new full-size windows were inserted into existing window openings with secondary frames concealed behind the brickwork.

Blackened wood has been an increasingly popular material choice for residential projects. Other examples include a charred-timber house extension in London by Chris Dyson architects, and the Muji Hut – a simple prefab cabin intended to suit a wide variety of locations.

Photography is by Ste Murray.


Project credits:

Architect: Declan Scullion, Scullion Architects
Engineer: Brunner Consulating Engineers
Contractor: Upgrade Construction

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3Novices:Jade Doskow’s Lost Utopias photo series documents past World’s Fairs sites

Photographer Jade Doskow has spent the last decade documenting crumbling and thriving World’s Fair sites across North America and Europe for her Lost Utopias series.

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
Knoxville 1982 World’s Fair, “Energy Turns the World”, Sunsphere, 2009.

Once a display of the time’s most pioneering ideas, these exposition sites now exist predominantly in a state of decline or dereliction.

The dystopian-style series has seen Doskow travel to and photograph the remaining art, architecture and landscaping at 27 of the World’s Fairs sites across North America and Europe.

The images illustrate the urban sites in their recent states, having either been left victim to the elements like New York’s 1964 State Pavilion, or revived and maintained as popular tourist attractions like Paris’ Eiffel Tower.

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
Philadelphia 1876 World’s Fair, “Centennial Exposition”, Fair Washrooms, 2008.

The concept for the Lost Utopias project initially developed from a family trip to Seville in 2004, when New York-based Doskow came across the 1992 World’s Exposition site.

“I was immediately captivated by the surreality of the situation and the seemingly hodgepodge use of the huge site,” she explained.

“Canals were filled with tall grasses, a decorative fountain glistened with beer cans and algae, many structures were overgrown with weeds, yet several buildings were still in use, including for the RTVA radio station of Seville.”

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
New York 1964 World’s Fair, “Peace Through Understanding”, Unisphere, 2009.

Following this experience, in 2006 Doskow began to plan her project of photographing numerous World’s Fairs sites across the world, which took off a year later with the 1939 and 1964 New York sites, then moving on to locations in Chicago and Europe.

Doskow described the project as “a cross-disciplinary extravaganza encapsulating science, industry, art, architecture, as well as the historical and cultural frameworks in which each past fair had happened, which influenced the specific context in which everything was constructed and conceived in regards to technology, race, and design.”

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
Seattle 1962 World’s Fair, “Century 21 Exposition”,  Science Center Arches at Night, 2014.

Not only was the history compelling, Doskow told Dezeen, but the different ways in which each city dealt with the sites after their closing also revealed a lot about the city itself and how it has approached historic preservation and urban planning.

Doskow devotes around three to five days to each place, researching their current condition and contemporary layout in comparison to the original fair maps. In doing so, she aims to capture images that “reflect the current use of the structures and landscaping as well as the emotional and metaphysical state of the place”.

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
Seattle 1962 World’s Fair, “Century 21 Exposition”, Monorail with Gehry-Designed EMP Museum, 2014.

Out of all the sites captured, Doskow said the “most successful metaphor” for the project was the 1964 New York State Pavilion in Queens.

Despite being situated in one of the world’s most well-known cities, and built by the modern architect Philip Johnson, the site nonetheless exists in a half abandoned “limbo state”, being too difficult and costly to be repurposed and yet too important to be demolished.

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
New York 1964 World’s Fair, “Peace Through Understanding”, New York State Pavilion, 2008.

Deserted sites like this stand in stark contrast to the various existing sites like Paris’ Eiffel Tower, Trocadero, and Palais de Chaillot (all constructed for Paris’ 1937 Exposition Internationale) which have been consistently used and improved upon.

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
Paris 1889 / 1937 World’s Fairs, “Exposition Universelle/La Vie Moderne”, Eiffel Tower, Trocadero, and Palais de Chaillot, 2007.

Taking a slower, more meditative approach to shooting the sites, Doskow uses a large-format camera for the project, similar to what would have been used by the photographic pioneers of the early World’s Fairs.

After processing the film, she then “painstakingly perfects” the images using photoshop, sometimes taking up to a year to complete a final print.

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
Paris 1937 World’s Fair, “Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne”, Graffiti, Palais de Tokyo, 2007.

“As any artist can tell you, it is important to sit with an image for quite a while and figure out if it works and if it makes sense in the greater context of the project,” Doskow told Dezeen.

“Also photography and world’s fairs had a direct and reciprocal relationship, as the first major photography exhibition was at the Great Exhibition of 1851 in Crystal Palace in London, so I appreciate being able to use similar tools as to what the early pioneers would have used.”

Jade Doskow's ten-year photography project documents the "Lost Utopias" of past World's Fairs
Brussels 1958 World’s Fair, “A World View: A New Humanism”, Atomium at Night, 2008.

She finished photographing the North American sites in 2015, and by 2016 the first monograph of her work, Lost Utopias, was published by Black Dog London. She has since spent the last few years revisiting sites that have changed since she last shot them.

Following this decade-long project, Doskow now wishes to focus more on sites outside of America and Europe, and plans to base her photography in places like Japan, China, South Korea, and Australia over the next five years.

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3Novices:Papier Machine booklet features electronic toys that are made from its pages

French designers Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage have designed a set of 13 electronic toys that are cut, folded and assembled from paper printed in special ink. 

Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage design electronic toys that are made from paper printed on special ink

The pair set out to create toys that would highlight the omnipresence of electronics, using paper printed with conductive or thermosensitive ink, and a kit of components such as batteries and propellors.

Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage design electronic toys that are made from paper printed on special ink

“As pointed out in its title, Papier Machine is mainly made of paper, a familiar material that one isn’t afraid to mess up,” Pinaffo told Dezeen.

“Paper can be layered, creased, folded, bent, cut, fragmented, frayed, flattened, hung on walls, assembled into volumes – these simple actions enable super low-tech though interactive experiences.”

Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage design electronic toys that are made from paper printed on special ink

The Switch toy requires a piece of bundled foil to be thrown into it to complete a circuit and allow five black dots to change colour, while the Playing Track sends a ball bearing down a zigzag path to create different noises.

Another toy needs a pencil to make marks and create different sounds, and another, target-style device uses humidity sensors and colour-changing ink to respond to spitballs by revealing secret letters. The pair also used wind sensors to create a ghost-shaped toy with paper fringes that bleeps when it’s blown on.

Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage design electronic toys that are made from paper printed on special ink

“We wanted to show that electronics are not magical, but have chemical and physical principles and that all these invisible sensors have shapes,” added Pinaffo. 

Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage design electronic toys that are made from paper printed on special ink

Pinaffo and Pluvinage based the bright colours and patterns of the Papier Machine toys on classic arcade games, creating pieces that were “both functional and decorative” with space to incorporate the circuitry required.

“We used a geometrical and abstract alphabet of shapes to leave room for the user’s appropriation,” added Pinaffo. “Anyone is free to see monsters, or cities via sports fields or race tracks in our toys, in the same way you see different things when you look at the electronics of mobile phones under the microscope.”

Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage design electronic toys that are made from paper printed on special ink

The duo say that the toys will last as long as their owner cares for them but concede that paper is a more fragile material. They suggest damaged toys can be fixed with tape, or broken circuits repaired using silver pen.

Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage design electronic toys that are made from paper printed on special ink

Papier Machine has already been shown at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, and the pair are also working on bigger versions of the toys that could be displayed floor-to-ceiling in other exhibition spaces or museums.

Technology Will Save Us has similarly used toys to help children have a more tangible understanding of technology, with interactive learning kits based on conductive dough.

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3Novices:10 of the most captivating photo series to celebrate World Photography Day

Today is World Photography Day, and to mark the occasion we’ve rounded up 10 of the best photo series published on Dezeen over the past year – including 360-views of the Tate Switch House, an insight into Pyongyang’s unique architecture, and a look inside the flats of the Barbican estate.


Barbican residents offer a look inside their homes

For his book, Residents: Inside the Iconic Barbican Estate, London-based photographer Anton Rodriguez aimed to highlight the stylish living spaces created by many of the current residents of the brutalist complex, which is home to over 4,000 people.

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Beautified China by Kris Provoost

Kris Provoost photographs the most flamboyant architecture of China’s building boom

OMA’s trouser-shaped CCTV tower and Herzog & de Meuron’s Bird’s Nest stadium feature in this photo series by architect Kris Provoost named The Beautified China, which documents the “weird architecture” the country has tried to ban.

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Jan Kempenaers documents Soviet-era war memorials in black and white photo series

Belgian photographer Jan Kempenaers documented a series of second world war memorials across Europe for his photoset, which focuses on a series of ruined concrete monuments built in the 1960s and 70s across the former Yugoslavian territories.

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Raphael Olivier’s photographs of North Korea reveal Pyongyang’s unique architecture

Left fascinated by Pyongyang after a one-day trip from China, photographer Raphael Olivier returned to the city to spend more time documenting its buildings and monuments – which is based on austere Soviet architecture, but features quirks taken from Korean culture.

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Childrens Insane Ward Matt Van der Velde Architecture Abandoned Asylums Interior Jonglez Publishing

Matt Van der Velde photographs abandoned insane asylums

Canadian photographer Matt Van der Velde captured the decaying hospitals once used to treat patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, having developed a “morbid curiosity” from his own mental health issues.

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Deserted Japanese theme park photographed just before demolition

Built in Nara Prefecture in 1961, this theme park was expected to become Japan’s answer to Disneyland. But it struggled to compete when both Disney and Universal Studios opened up their own parks in nearby Osaka and Tokyo, and it eventually closed in the summer of 2006. Ahead of its demolition in 2016, photographer Romain Veillon photographed the abandoned rides to create this eerie image set.

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Tate Modern Switch House captured in 360-degree photography

The future of photography is in 360 degrees according to British photographer Rod Edwards, who used the technology to capture Herzog & de Meuron’s extension to the Tate Modern gallery in London.

See the full 360-degree views ›


Dress Tent by Robin Lasser and Adrienne Pao

Dress Tents by Robin Lasser and Adrienne Pao are part shelter, part attire

Artists Robin Lasser and Adrienne Pao created a series of structures that can both be donned as extreme gowns and used as shelters, before capturing the result as whimsical imagery. The costumes and photos were all brought together for the first time during a show at the Center for Photographic Art in Carmel, California, last summer.

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Dramatis Personae photography series by Sebastian Weiss

Paris’ most eye-catching buildings take centre stage in Sebastian Weiss’ latest photo series

These images are inspired by a recent trip photographer Sebastian Weiss took to France, and feature landmark buildings including Jean Nouvel’s Philharmonie de Paris concert hall and the cauliflower-like balconies of the Choux de Créteil tower blocks by Gérard Grandval.

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Peter Ortner photographs 500 bus stops in former Soviet Union

German photographer Peter Ortner spent seven years documenting 500 bus stops across former Soviet countries. Unlike the grey concrete buildings often associated with socialist architecture built throughout the 20th century, Ortner found an eclectic, colourful micro-architecture that emerged on the roadside, including a triangular pavilion, a winged shelter and several mosaic designs.

Read the full story ›

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3Novices:This week, the Garden Bridge was scrapped and controversial cladding passed fire safety tests

This week on Dezeen, the trust behind London’s Garden Bridge announced its closure, while new fire safety test results of aluminium cladding blamed for the Grenfell Tower blaze were released.

The final nail in the coffin of the Thomas Heatherwick-designed Garden Bridge came with the closure of the Garden Bridge Trust, which cited a lack of support from London mayor Sadiq Khan. A financial inquiry into the scheme had found that although the project originally came with a £60 million price tag, it would cost British taxpayers an estimated £200 million.

Cladding passes fire safety test ordered following Grenfell Tower blaze

The UK government entered architecture news again this week after the results of a safety test carried out on one of the variations of aluminium composite cladding blamed for the Grenfell Tower fire showed that the material complied with existing building regulations.

Other UK news included Historic England’s addition of five new buildings for the 70th anniversary of “The List”, and a legal dispute between Poundland and Mondelez that will test the strength of Toblerone’s trade mark following a controversial redesign.

IKEA Jesper and lock technology
Kanye West and IKEA among Designs of the Year nominees

2017’s Beazley Designs of the Year awards nominations were announced, with Kanye West, OMA and IKEA among the 62 names to get a nod across the six categories of architecture, digital, fashion, graphics, product and transport.

IKEA was also in the headlines after it released instructions showing how to turn its rugs into the capes worn in Game of Thrones, following the disclosure that the show’s costume designers use them to dress actors.

Zaha Hadid Architects reveals progress on Beijing skyscraper with “world’s highest atrium”

Zaha Hadid Architects distributed new black and white images showing the future world’s highest atrium, which is under construction inside a 207-metre skyscraper the firm has designed for Beijing.

A new rendering of the 1,550-foot Central Park Tower was also unveiled. It will be the tallest residential building on earth following its planned completion in 2019.

Pantone releases purple shade in memory of Prince

In other design news, Pantone Color Institute unveiled a new shade in honour of the late pop icon Prince, inspired by the musician’s purple Yamaha piano.

And the Vantablack saga continued as Massachusetts manufacturer NanoLab emerged as the latest contender to take on Anish Kapoor’s exclusive hold on the world’s blackest black, with their new version called Singularity Black.

Huge porthole windows bathe Melbourne apartments with natural light

Popular projects this week included a staggered block of Melbourne apartments featuring large porthole windows, the pared-back grey interior of the first Arket store in Copenhagen and streetwear brand Supreme’s update of Alvar Aalto’s classic 400 Tank armchair.

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3Novices:Petite Friture borrows modernist architectural details for Abstraction collection

Petite Friture‘s Abstraction collection includes lighting and wallpaper featuring geometric patterns based on optical illusions and modernist buildings. 

Petite Friture's Abstraction collection includes lighting and wallpaper
Celia-Hannes’ Kling lighting pairs bell-shaped shades with anthracite brass rings

The range – which will be unveiled at Maison&Objet in Paris – includes pendant lamps with circular details, lights that hang together in clusters and wallpaper that takes inspiration from architectural details.

French design brand Petite Friture plans to show the collection among an installation of mirrors and brightly coloured geometric panels, designed to emphasise the pieces’ connection with optical art.

Petite Friture's Abstraction collection includes lighting and wallpaper
The Kling lighting is also available with an arched support attached to two contrasting shades

Included in the range is French-Austian duo Celia-Hannes‘ Kling lighting, which pairs bell-shaped shades with anthracite brass rings. The lamps come in several different table and pendant versions, attached to a single circle or to an arched support that contrasts shades in different shapes and sizes.

Petite Friture's Abstraction collection includes lighting and wallpaper
Sylvain Willenz’ Chains lamps feature subtly ridged black shades

Belgian designer Sylvain Willenz has designed a set of lamps that function as a “lighting garland”, featuring subtly ridged black shades that can be arranged as a single light or in groups that are hung bunched together.

Petite Friture's Abstraction collection includes lighting and wallpaper
They can be bunched together to form a “lighting garland”

The Abstraction range also features wallpaper that borrows from architectural forms, including French designer Leslie David‘s postmodern-style Constellation 1 and 2, which pair slender lines with chunky circles and rectangles.

Petite Friture's Abstraction collection includes lighting and wallpaper
Wallpaper in the Abstraction range is by Leslie David and Ana Montiel

Mexico-based illustrator Ana Montiel‘s Utopia Ascending wallpaper is more riotous, featuring a jumble of overlapping shapes that also seem to have been borrowed from modernist buildings.

Petite Friture's Abstraction collection includes lighting and wallpaper
Montiel’s Utopia Ascending design has a jumble of overlapping shapes

Petite Friture – which was established in 2009 to champion the work of young French designers – often adopts a playful approach to its products, previously launching sausage-shaped lamps and sofas covered in cushions designed to look like giant pebbles.

The brand demonstrated its love of mid-century earlier in the year, when it showed a new furniture collection against a backdrop styled on a vibrant, modernist home.

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