Design

3Novices:10 furniture designs from Milan 2017 that showcase millennial pink

It was hard to miss millennial pink during this year’s Milan design week, now that the colour has infiltrated the furniture design industry. Dezeen editor Amy Frearson has selected 10 of the best pink designs on show.


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Stay Daybed by Nika Zupanc for Sé

Slovenian designer Nika Zupanc chose the popular blush-beige shade for two designs she presented during the design week. The first was this daybed for British brand , which pairs pink upholstery with a powder-coated steel frame.

The brand’s exhibition also included Zupanc’s 2013 Stardust armchair in soft pink.

Find out more about Stay Daybed ›


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88 Secrets by Nika Zupanc for Scarlet Splendour

Zupanc’s second pink design in Milan was this range of cabinets for Indian brand Scarlet Splendour. On show at Spazio Rossana Orlandi, the 88 Secrets collection features ribbon-like details.


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Lotus Sanctum by Matteo Cibic for Scarlet Splendour

Italian designer Matteo Cibic paired pink with polished brass to create this cabinet, also presented by Scarlet Splendour. According to the brand, it was inspired by “the purity of the flower it is named after”.

Elsewhere in Milan, Cibic also showed a series of 365 anthropomorphic vases that feature the colour.


Isla by Note Design Studio for Sancal

Note Design Studio‘s biggest launch in Milan was this island sofa for Spanish brand Sancal, shown at the Salone del Mobile in millennial pink. It is the latest in a series of pink products created by the Stockholm-based design studio.


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Five Pouff by Anderssen & Voll for Muuto

Millennial pink was one of the most noticeable colours at the Salone del Mobile stand for Danish brand Muuto. Highlights included the new Five Pouff by Norwegian studio Anderssen & Voll, a five-sided piece with stitched stripes.

Find out more about Five Pouff ›


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Assembly sofa by Diesel Living with Moroso

Italian brand Moroso teamed up with fashion brand Diesel to create what it calls a “collection of laid-back, comfortable products” in Milan. Among them was the Assembly sofa, which combines textured fabrics like plush velvet and felt with industrial steel bolts.


Le Refuge by Marc Ange

Created by Paris-based designer Marc Ange, this pink bed became the most Instagrammed installation at Milan design week. It is shaded beneath a canopy of pink leaf-shaped panels.


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Alter by Olivia Lee Altar

A vanity table optimised for selfies was among the objects presented at Salone Satellite by Singaporean designer Olivia Lee. It formed part of a collection aiming to solve some of the problems created by the presence of new technologies in our homes.

Find out more about Alter ›


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Pavilion Rug by Britt Bonnesen for Normann Copenhagen

Designer Britt Bonnesen paired pink with dark green for this long narrow rug for Danish brand Normann Copenhagen, although it also comes in other colour combinations. The rug is made from bamboo silk, which creates the glossy texture.


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Pocket by Stone Designs  for Blå Station

This chair created by Stone Designs for Swedish furniture company Blå Station features an extra compartment to keep restaurants, bars and hotel lobbies free of clutter. It features a scoop-shaped shell, sitting on four steel legs.

Find out more about Pocket ›

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3Novices:Colour of the moment “millennial pink” dominates at Milan design week

So-called millennial pink is hugely popular in fashion right now, but has also become the most sought-after colour in furniture design, this year’s Milan design week revealed.

The name millennial pink was coined to describe a muted shade of the colour – somewhere between beige and blush.

With other design trends thin on the ground during Milan design week last month, the colour somehow managed to become one of the most noticeable crazes. Not only was it showcased by popular brands including Moroso, Muuto and Normann Copenhagen, it featured on the event’s most Instagrammed installation, Marc Ange’s Le Refuge.

Designed by Marc Ange, this pink bed and matching leaf canopy became the most Instagrammed installation at Milan design week

“Pink is a quite soft and friendly colour – it tends to work well with a lot of other colours and adds a certain glow,” explained Sanna Wåhlin, one of the designers at Swedish office Note Design Studio.

Her team selected the colour for its biggest Milan launch, an island sofa for Spanish brand Sancal, but also recently used it to create a pop-up restaurant at Stockholm Design Week and a collection of workplace partitions.

One of the main reasons for the colour’s popularity, according to Wåhlin, is that – unlike more vibrant shades of pink – it is free from girly-girl associations, so appeals to men as well as women.

“We use pink a lot and we are more men than women working in the studio,” she told Dezeen.

“When suggesting pink to our clients, they seem to feel quite brave when they say yes, and being brave in design is a good thing – it means you’re moving forward, pushing boundaries.”

Swedish office Note Design Studio selected pink for its biggest Milan launch, an island sofa for Spanish brand Sancal

The growing interest in pink has been widely documented in the media, and not only by fashion publications – the Guardian, New York Magazine and the Times have all written about it extensively.

The trend can be easily traced back to 2016, when the more warm-hued Rose Quartz was one of Pantone’s two colours of the year. The colour company later listed Pale Dogwood, an even closer match, on its trend forecast for spring 2017.

For Italian designer Matteo Cibic, the inspiration for the colour goes back even further – to Wes Anderson’s movie The Grand Budapest Hotel, where it features frequently. He is one of many creatives to list the movie as a design stimulus.

“Wes Anderson used it in Mendl’s pastry in The Grand Budapest Hotel, and it reminds me of marshmallows,” he told Dezeen.

“I often find pink in the work of my design heroes,” he added, listing fashion designer Paul Smith and interior designer India Mahdavi as role models. “It definitely makes your day and makes the people around you more happy.”

Vasonaso by Matteo Cibic
Italian designer Matteo Cibic used the shade for two projects he showed in Milan. One was a series of 365 anthropomorphic vases

Cibic used the colour for two separate projects he showed in Milan: a series of 365 anthropomorphic vases and a decorative cabinet he created for Indian furniture brand Scarlet Splendour.

Slovenian designer Nika Zupanc also chose the shade for two designs she showed in Milan: a range of cabinets, also for Scarlet Splendour, and an angular daybed for British brand Sé.

Zupanc said she has worked with various shades of pink over the last decade, in an “almost rebellion manner”, as the colour was so unpopular until recently.

Dezeen Pinterest roundups Pink
Slovenian designer Nika Zupanc said she first started using pink as a rebellion. She showed two pink designs in Milan, including these cabinets for Scarlet Splendour

“I first used a dusty pink shade for my Maid chair, which was introduced at Salone Satellite in 2007. I remember there were absolutely no objects in this colour under the spotlight of contemporary design,” she said.

“We all felt that we are courageous for introducing this colour, as it had a sort of bad reputation at that time, symbolising frivolity and un-seriousness, far away from the expectations of the design establishment.”

“We all hoped that by using it in this new, contemporary way, we would bring it out of the ghetto and give it a new meaning,” she continued. “I guess we succeeded.”

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3Novices:BBGK Architekci uses stained concrete walls to create Katyn Museum inside Warsaw barbican

Red concrete walls frame a chasm leading to a memorial inside Warsaw‘s barbican that commemorates the thousands of Polish citizens murdered by the Soviet secret police during the second world war.

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

Designed by local studio BBGK Architekci, the Katyn Museum– one of five projects in the running for this year’s Mies van der Rohe Award – is split across three 19th-century buildings of the fortified red brick citadel in Warsaw’s old town.

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

The Polish military museum commemorates the mass murder of more than 20,000 Soviet prisoners between 1939 and 1940 in Russia’s Katyn Forest.

“Katyn Museum is there to commemorate a painful episode of Polish history which took place during world war two when over 20,000 Polish military officers and state officials were brutally murdered by the Soviet secret police,” said the studio.

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

“The history of Katyn in its cruelty and evil immensity is much too difficult to comprehend,” it added. “Fifteen plaques commemorating the 21,768 victims located in the historic gunrest raise questions about the meaning of the concepts of evil, good, forgiveness.”

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

The entrance is set at the barbican’s Nowomiejska Gate and exhibition spaces are arranged over two levels of the caponier fortification.

A shaft flanked by tall red-tinged concrete walls leads down into a third exhibition space within the brick vaults, where the names of the victims are displayed on plaques.

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

Personal items belonging to those murdered in the Katyn Forest – a knight chess piece, letters, ammunition and various badges of decoration – were used to imprint the 12-metre-high walls.

An oak cross positioned at ground level is aligned with the red concrete passage, a material chosen to tone with the red brickwork of the original buildings.

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

“This is where the narrative of the museum ends – here we also decided on the strongest spatial gesture,”architect Malwina Borowiec told Dezeen.

“The two walls, made entirely of coloured concrete bricks, cut the shafts of the 150-year-old Russian citadel. In many places in the concrete we have stamped small items found on the victims.”

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

“We decided to use red-tinted concrete so that the new material wouldn’t overwhelm the original matter of brick,” she explained. “The new substance was about connecting with the existing structure of the old Warsaw citadel.”

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

The Katyn Museum is up against a London apartment block by Alison Brooks, a shelter for medieval ruins in Ribe by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects, an Amsterdam housing scheme renovated by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur, and a second world war memorial in Rivesaltes by Rudy Ricciotti for the Mies van der Rohe Award 2017.

Katyn Museum by BBGK Architekci

The biennial award, named after German-American architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, is the most prestigious accolade in European architecture.

An original shortlist of 40 projects was whittled down to find the five finalists in February, and the winner of the €60,000 (£51,000) prize pot will be announced next month.


Project credits:

Architecture: BBGK Architekci
Architects: Jan Belina-Brzozowski, Konrad Grabowiecki, Jerzy Kalina, Krzysztof Lang
Co-authors: Joanna Orłowska, Marek Sobol, Emilia Sobańska, łukasz Węcławski, Agnieszka Grzywacz, Ewelina Wysokińska, Jacek Kretkiewicz, Tomasz Pluciński, Maciek Rąbek, Marcin Szulc, Barbara Trojanowska, Jolanta Fabiszewska

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3Novices:Faye Toogood and Philippe Malouin design minimal furniture for Matter Made’s XVII exhibition

Making its debut at Milan design week, American brand Matter Made has brought together designers including Faye Toogood, Philippe Malouin and Pedro Venzon to produce a sculptural furniture and lighting collection.

Milan: Matter Made MMXVII

Called MM XVII, the collection was arranged across a series of colour-blocked vignettes in a space on Milan’s Via Pietro Maroncelli. The pieces all feature striking silhouettes and minimal details, with a focus on contrasting materials.

The contribution by British designer Faye Toogood is a series of lights with forms inspired by the rounded caps and long stalks of mushrooms.

The Puff Ball series includes an oval wall sconce, a domed table lamp, and a floor light that sits on a pair of chunky legs and features an oversized shade. The lights emit a soft glow through their raw fibreglass shades, which contrast matt aluminium supports.

Milan: Matter Made MMXVII

Toogood, who held her first solo show in the US earlier this year, also showcased wallpaper based on her own paintings during Milan design week.

Philippe Malouin also created lighting for the MM XVII collection. His Arca chandelier features three tiers of upwardly curving, blackened brass branches that each support a small LED globe.

Milan: Matter Made MMXVII

The Arca chandelier is based on a modular system, meaning arms can be added or taken away as desired. In addition, the designer created a coat hook that echoes the form of the chandelier.

Milan: Matter Made MMXVII

Brazilian designer Pedro Venzon‘s Pudica chair – based on shapes found in architecture left over from Portugal’s colonisation of Brazil – is included in the collection. Venzon borrowed the typically curved windows of his country’s colonial buildings to create the distinctive, oblong backrest of his stackable chair.

Made from steel or brass, Venzon’s second chair for the collection has an ultra-minimal backrest designed to appear as if delicately perched. Its name, Avoa, echoes the Portuguese word for flight.

Milan: Matter Made MMXVII

American designer Jonah Takagi created a Shaker-inspired candle holder for the collection. Machined from a block of aluminium, brass or marble, the Setup candle holder features four holes that are designed to accommodate several candle sizes including leftover stubs.

Other highlights from the collection include the industrial-style Centina aluminium shelving. Featuring angular column supports “inspired by the governing geometries of architecture”, the shelving is designed by London studio Oeuffice. The Slon dining table, created by Ana Kraš, is made from solid black marble.

Milan: Matter Made MMXVII

Matter Made is the in-house brand of New York gallery and showroom Matter, which was founded in 2003 by Jamie Gray. He launched Matter Made in 2008 and manufactures the collection in Brooklyn.

The pieces were on display at Via Petro Maroncelli between 7 and 9 April for Milan design week.

Other collections shown during Milan design week include Alain Gilles’ steel-framed furniture for Vincent Sheppard, a range of tiles based on Le Corbusier’s colour theory, and a set of minimal chairs modelled on Hong Kong’s architecture.

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3Novices:Herzog & de Meuron designs table version of Unterlinden museum lighting

This trumpet-shaped table lamp by Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron is based on pendant lighting originally designed for a French museum.

Launched by Italian brand Artemide at Milan design week, the Unterlinden lamps feature the same pointed metal shade used in the Musée Unterlinden in Colmar, France, which the firm extended in 2016.

Unterlinden table light by Herzog & de Meuron for Artemide

Made from die-cast aluminium or bronze, with an antique-style patina and ridged exterior, the Unterlinden lamps sit on tall, slender stems and circular bases.

According to Artemide – which also launched lamps designed by Neri&Hu to resemble birds perched on wires – its metal support forms the perfect angle to create non-glaring light for working areas.

Herzog & de Meuron also used both pendant and table versions of the lamp for the interiors of another recent architectural project, the Feltrinelli Porta Volta offices in Milan.

Unterlinden table light by Herzog & de Meuron for Artemide

The Swiss firm is a perennial favourite with Dezeen readers, taking third place in Dezeen Hot List, just behind Zaha Hadid Architects and Bjarke Ingels Group.

It completed the much-anticipated Tate Modern Switch House extension in 2016, and recently revealed images of its concrete-heavy interiors for New York’s 56 Leonard “Jenga” Tower.

The firm often creates design objects as part of its architectural projects, going so far as to launch its own online store in 2016 to sell furniture and homeware.

Milan design week saw the launch of several new lighting collections, including a chain-like pendant by New Zealand brand Resident, which was made of separate LED-rimmed rings that connect together.

Italian duo Formafantasma put a sculptural spin on the power cable, turning it into a structural part of its Wire Ring lighting, while the newly established Child Studio made globe-like lamps that appeared as if frozen precariously in place.

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3Novices:Berman Guedes Stretton upgrades Powell & Moya’s modernist University of Oxford buildings

Berman Guedes Stretton sought to preserve and enhance the modernist designs of buildings at two University of Oxford colleges during renovations to improve their interior layout.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

The Oxford- and London-based firm was invited to oversee the renovation of a building designed in 1969 by Powell & Moya, a firm best known for its Skylon tensegrity structure at the 1951 Festival of Britain.

The refurbishment focused on retaining the character of the residential building at the university’s Corpus Christi College, which features stone walls intersected by crisp concrete elements and large glazed surfaces.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

“Powell & Moya, winners of the RIBA Gold Medal in 1974 are one of the 20th century’s most significant post-war practices and it is right that their buildings should be preserved for future generations,” said the practice’s managing director Gary Collins.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

The university has previously engaged Berman Guedes Stretton (BGS) to oversee other renovation projects and Collins said the institution is as dedicated to maintaining its modern architectural history as it is the older college buildings.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

“BGS has refurbished and extended buildings in Oxford that date from the 1600s to the 1990s, and each throws up different challenges,” he said.

“We are very fortunate to be engaged with history in this way and often to be responsible for creating contemporary additions adding a new chapter to the building’s history.”

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

Improvements to the Corpus Christi building include the reconfiguration of the interior to incorporate en-suite shower rooms in most rooms, and the addition of three rooms on the top floor.

The introduction of double glazing and attempts to address insulation issues caused by thermal bridges inherent in the existing structure helped to enhance the indoor climate and energy consumption.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

A previously unused concrete area in front of the building’s entrance has been transformed into a paved communal garden incorporating a small amphitheatre.

Now known as the Hugh Oldham Building, the annex is connected by a glazed corridor to the adjacent Grade I-listed Jackson Building, which was also refurbished as part of the project.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

Berman Guedes Stretton also recently finished the latest phase of improvement works at Wolfson College, which was completed in 1974 and is Powell & Moya’s best known work in Oxford.

In 2013, the firm added an auditorium, porter’s lodge, seminar rooms and offices to what is one of Oxford’s largest postgraduate colleges.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

The firm’s latest project involved extending the main library at ground and first floor, as well as adding a space for group working, a media room, academic offices and a cafe.

“Our approach to the new academic wing follows college founder Isaiah Berlin’s brief for the original buildings, which was clear lines of simple geometry and a gentle curve,” said the architects.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

The curved facade of the extension flanks a newly created quad that is typical of Oxford colleges and is overlooked by an existing building as well as by the new reception.

The landscaping of the quad was key to the project. It combines existing granite setts with Irish limestone and precast concrete benches that provide a space to sit outside next to the cafe.

Powell & Moya buildings refurbishment by BGS

In 2014, another Powell & Moya project, the revered Chichester Festival Theatre in southern England, was given a major facelift by London studio Haworth Tompkins.

Like Berman Guedes Stretton, the studio was tasked with modernising and restoring the 1960s building to preserve and adapt it for future generations.

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