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3Novices:Losing darts player pins blame on ‘opponent’s smelly fart’

Wesley Harms 10-2 loss against two-time world champion Gary Anderson at a Grand Slam of Darts game Saturday could have been due to a “fragrant smell” that was unleashed during the match, he told reporters.
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Design

3Novices:Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos completes Brutalist concrete sports centre in Portugal

Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos has completed a sports centre in Portugal, featuring angular concrete surfaces that funnel daylight into its public foyer.

Locally based studio Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos designed the building as a sports facility for use by the local Pedro Barbosa School, as well as by the community of Viana do Castelo.

Angular forms create "dynamic" aesthetic at Portuguese sports facility by Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos

Named the Atlantic Pavilion, the sports facility is located on a street facing the waterfront called Avenida do Atlântico, in the municipality of Viana do Castelo.

A restricted budget and the need for easy maintenance going forward informed the design of the building, which is guided by the principles of Brutalism in its use of concrete both externally and internally.

Angular forms create "dynamic" aesthetic at Portuguese sports facility by Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos

Working within the predefined constraints, the architects aimed to develop a proposal that  offered “an appealing dynamic and humanised image,” they said.

The building occupies almost the full extent of its compact site. It contains a 650-square-metre sports hall that adjoins a perpendicular block housing four dedicated changing areas – two for players and a further two for officials.

Angular forms create "dynamic" aesthetic at Portuguese sports facility by Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos

At the corner where the two blocks connect, an entrance pavilion provides a distinctive presence within the heterogenous streetscape.

The entrance structure features glazed doors positioned beneath a cantilevered upper storey that incorporates clerestory windows framed by angled concrete surfaces.

Angular forms create "dynamic" aesthetic at Portuguese sports facility by Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos

Recessed windows are protected from direct sunlight but ensure plenty of natural illumination is able to enter the interior.

The angular form also echoes the shape of the sports hall’s main elevation, which slopes to free up pavement space below and follows the rake of the bleachers inside.

Angular forms create "dynamic" aesthetic at Portuguese sports facility by Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos

Visitors are welcomed into a space where up to 80 people can wait to enter the sports hall’s seating area. The foyer also contains a reception desk and a small bar area, and provides access to the toilet facilities.

The building is predominantly monochrome in its material palette, with the concrete surfaces complemented by panels of grey stone that are used to clad the elevations of the sports hall and the entrance pavilion’s lower storey.

Angular forms create "dynamic" aesthetic at Portuguese sports facility by Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos

“The general tone of the building is grey, which reminds us of the beautiful grey sea,” said the architects.

In the foyer, artist Mário Rocha was commissioned to create embossed tiles featuring motifs inspired by the crustaceans and algae found across the local beaches.

Angular forms create "dynamic" aesthetic at Portuguese sports facility by Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos

Inside the sports hall, the exposed concrete walls and structural columns lend the space a robust and functional feel, which is offset by the warm, knotted timber used to form the roof structure.

Concrete has proved popular with Portuguese architects recently. Portuguese studio Promontorio used concrete to create a spiralling concrete staircase to transform a 1980s office building in Lisbon, and architect Pedro Geraldes designed a gabled concrete shell for a control centre overlooking a dam.

Photography by João Morgado.


Project credits:

Architecture: Valdemar Coutinho
Civil engineering: José Ferreira da Costa
Electrical engineering: Bartolomeu Sampaio
Ventilation and thermal behaviour: Gasair
Architect (3D modelling): André Palhares
Construction: Valentim José Luís & Filhos
Technical direction: Paulo Torres
Tile panel: Mário Rocha

The post Valdemar Coutinho Arquitectos completes Brutalist concrete sports centre in Portugal appeared first on Dezeen.

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Design

3Novices:Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse is “British tea hall turned Chinese canteen”

Linehouse‘s contemporary Hong Kong restaurant takes its cue from the life of cross-cultural pioneer John Anthony and references a retro, east London Chinese canteen.

Designed by Shanghai and Hong Kong-based architecture and design studio Linehouse, the restaurant is named after John Anthony, the first Chinese-born man to be naturalised as a British citizen, in 1805.

Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse Studio fuses east and west

Anthony worked for the East India Company at Limehouse in London’s east end, where his job was to provide food and lodging to arriving Chinese sailors.

“The design drew on John Anthony’s journey, exploring the fusion of architectural styles and materiality between east and west as well as colonial architecture blurred with eastern detailing, to create a British tea hall turned Chinese canteen,” said Linehouse co-founder Alex Mok.

Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse Studio fuses east and west

Throughout the restaurant, Linehouse explored the materials Anthony himself would have encountered on his journey: hand-glazed tiles, natural and racked renders, terracotta, hand-dyed fabrics and hand-woven wickers.

John Anthony guests enter down a staircase made of white metal and back-lit with diffused glass. The entrance offers a hint of the interior’s lime green terrazzo floor and triple-height arched ceiling, clad in pink tiles. The pink arches are reflected through the space in high-level mirrors.

Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse Studio fuses east and west

The main dining hall aims to reinterpret the storehouses of London’s docklands with a vaulted ceiling. The floors of this main hall are paved with reclaimed terracotta tiles from abandoned houses in rural China.

The fusion of Chinese canteen and colonial design is captured in the details of the timber bar with glass vitrines, wicker furniture, and gold and maroon floral fabrics.

Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse Studio fuses east and west

A collection of glass tubes containing gins infused with botanicals found along the spice routes hang above the bar. In the wall above the bar, arch-shaped enclaves display an expansive gin collection.

A white metal structure, reminiscent of an industrial storehouse roof, hangs from the render ceiling with suspended custom timber tube lamps. In the dining area, hammered copper lights line the walls.

Beyond the main hall, a series of arched spaces allow for more intimate dining. The arches are clad in handmade green and blue tiles and frame views of the kitchen. Turquoise curtains can be drawn to create privacy from the main restaurant areas.

A completely private dining room in the back of the restaurant features tiles hand-printed with large scale illustrations of commodities traded between the British and Chinese in the eighteenth century, such as medicinal poppies and exotic animals.

Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse Studio fuses east and west

“We had a local artist hand-paint these illustrations, which were then scanned and printed onto tiles by local suppliers.  Every tile was different so it was a labour of love to have the final wall installed,” Mok told Dezeen.

Behind the bar a room features floral booths divided by cream linen curtains hanging from a copper rail. Hand-dyed indigo linen hangs from the ceiling to invoke nautical life.

Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse Studio fuses east and west

Custom copper mounted vanities are fitted above the basins and recycled plastic tubes line the ceiling of the bathroom stalls. Circular windows in the bathroom doors also reference the ships of the East India Company.

As well as this east-meets-west design fusion, the interior scheme was guided by sustainability, which is also reflected in the food and drinks served at the restaurant. Menus and coasters are made of up-cycled paper and plastic, the floor tiles are reclaimed and materials are sustainably sourced.

Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse Studio fuses east and west

“All the lighting for this project was custom designed in-house, working with local craftsmen,” said Mok. “Most of the furniture was also custom-designed; the dining chair, all the tables, the rattan sofa are all locally produced.”

In Calgary, Canada, this dim sum restaurant and basement cocktail bar Two Penny Chinese by Canadian studio Sarah Ward Interiors looked to China’s art-deco era for colours and motifs that would invoke 1920s Shanghai.

The post Dim sum restaurant by Linehouse is “British tea hall turned Chinese canteen” appeared first on Dezeen.

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